Gait | What it is and How it Affects Running

If you’re a runner, you may have heard of the “pronation” term. This refers to something called “supination”: the way your foot rolls inward when you walk or run.

Running barefoot has become increasingly popular as the public and athletes alike become more aware of the running injuries that often plague serious runners. However, we must heed caution and remember that running barefoot is not as simple as taking off your shoes and hitting the road.

Gait definition

Gait refers to the pattern of movement of the legs during walking or running.
It is an intrinsic part of human locomotion, involved in moving one’s body through space.

Gait and running

When people run, the gait may be categorized as “overstriding” or “understriding.” Overstriders are likely to strike their heel first with each step before their foot gradually lowers back towards the ground.

Gait pattern

Gait is the footfall pattern that a person uses while walking or running. A gait is characterized by how the feet land when walking or running and how much weight is put on each foot during the gait.

Gait characteristics

A person’s gait can be characterized by how the feet land while walking or running and how much weight is put on each foot during the gait.

In common usage, ‘gait’ refers to a specific movement pattern of the legs during walking or running.

Human gait

Human gait refers to the pattern of movement of the legs during walking or running.
The term gait refers to the pattern of movement of the legs during walking or running.

The term “gait” is used in a general sense in human physiology, biomechanics, and neurology. However, one can also apply it to other animals, such as birds, rodents, reptiles, or even machines such as locomotives or robots.

Running gait

Running gait refers to the pattern of movement of the legs during running.
A person’s gait can be characterized by how the feet land while walking or running and how much weight is put on each foot during the gait.

Runners gait

The term “runner’s gait” refers to a pattern of movement of the legs during running.
A person’s gait can be characterized by how the feet land while walking or running and how much weight is put on each foot during the gait. How a runner’s gait is affected can be compared with how a runner interacts with their shoes.

Gait retraining

Gait training is the process of retraining a person’s gait, usually by physical exercise.

Gait retraining has been used to treat overstriding or understriding. A person’s gait can be characterized by how the feet land while walking or running and how much weight is put on each foot during the gait.

Gait preservation

Gait preservation is a medical therapy to preserve the function of the lower limbs following amputation.

Human gait types

Human gait types are classified according to the pattern of movement during walking and running.

Human gait types can be classified by how the feet land while walking or running and how much weight is put on each foot during the gait.

It is important to note that many different human gait patterns exist, and there is no one ideal or a correct way for people to walk or run.

Natural gait

A natural gait is a way a person moves without training. Natural gait refers to the way a person moves without any training. A natural gait is a way a person moves, not due to any outside treatment. Natural gait refers to the pattern of movement of the legs during walking or running.

How Barefoot Shoes affect your Gait

Barefoot Shoes are shoes that do not have any form of arch support, thus causing your foot to land in front of the ball of your foot. When barefoot shoes are worn, they increase what is called a “flat foot,” which causes overstriding gait. Overstriding occurs when the heel strikes first before the toe hits the ground, which causes it to be significantly lower than the heel strike.

Natural gait is an intrinsic part of human locomotion, involved in moving one’s body through space.

How to choose a shoe that will help your gait

The best way to choose a shoe that will help your gait is to consult a physical therapist, who will recommend the specific shoe that is right for you at the moment.

A human gait can be characterized by how the feet land while walking or running and how much weight is put on each foot during the gait.

Human gait types are classified according to the pattern of movement during walking and running.

Foot Strike

Foot strike refers to the first part of the foot to contact the ground during walking or running.

Footstrike pattern

Footstrike pattern refers to how people’s feet land when walking or running. Footstrike pattern is the action of a person’s foot to describe what type of gait they have. It is important in determining which gait a person has. For example, if you know someone has overstriding gait, you will know their footstrike pattern is heel strike before all else.

Foot Pronation

Foot pronation is the inward rotation of a foot on impact. Foot pronation occurs when a person’s foot strikes the ground with less force, causing their limb to move in the direction of plantarflexion (more toe down).

Foot Plantarflexion

Foot plantarflexion is the outward rotation of a heel during gait. Foot plantarflexion occurs when a person’s foot strikes the ground with more force, causing their limb to move in the direction of dorsiflexion (more heel up).

Foot Supination

Foot supination is the outward rotation of the afoot. Foot supination occurs when a person’s foot strikes the ground with less force, causing their limb to move in the direction of dorsiflexion (more heel up).

Foot Eversion

Foot eversion is the outward rolling of afoot. Foot eversion occurs when a person’s foot strikes the ground with more force, causing their limb to move in the direction of inversion (more outside turn).

Weight Distribution

Weight distribution is the relative amount of weight placed on the front, middle, and back of afoot.

Different gait types will be defined by their weight distribution and movement pattern during walking or running.

Ankle sprains are an injury to one or more ligaments in the ankle. According to WebMD, ankle sprains are common in athletes and generally caused by a change in direction while running or jumping, causing your foot to roll from side to side twisting your ankle.

Foot Orthoses

Foot orthoses are also known as corrective shoes, and they help in the treatment of activity-related conditions of the foot. Foot orthoses are custom-made devices generally prescribed by a podiatrist or a physical therapist.

Conclusion

You should consult a physical therapist for a specific shoe recommendation. The best type of shoe for you will depend on your pronation, weight distribution, and gait pattern. Your doctor may recommend custom orthotics in addition to a shoe that fits your foot’s needs.

Published Studies and Papers

“A biomechanical and gait analysis of a wide range of adult foot types in normal walking.” (2008)

“Footwear design impacts the natural variability in human walking kinematics” (2016

Footnotes
Bibliography

Beyond the Classroom, Inc. © 2017. All Rights Reserved.
https://www.activewalkingclassroom.com/
https://www.youtube.com/c/BeyondtheClassroominc
https://www.facebook.com/beyondtheclassroominc/
https://www.pinterest.com/btc_inc/
https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/1344077/?pathWildcard=1344077&pathWildcard=1344077&trkWildcard=%2Fcompany%2F1344077%2Fpage_logo
http://www.realfit.govt.nz/?go=footcare
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJ2S1UGSHok

White, C. D., Pile, S., & Berry, A. (2014). “Risk factors for acute lower limb fractures: a systematic review.” Injury, 45(2), 168-184.
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The fracture risk is highest in children and decreases with age, with the tenth percentile having a fracture rate of only 32% for ages three to 19 (Fisher et al., 2008). The risk of fracture increases when functioning independently, with the risk being 43% for those age eight and over (Fisher et al., 2008).

Injury Prevention Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). “What are the causes of childhood fractures?” Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/pdfs/fracture_factsheet.pdf on February 15, 2018.
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Hi there. This is Clare. Dave and I manage this site. We are outdoor enthusiasts. Most of the content is about products that we love using or have researched.
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